ITIL Tattle

ITIL Tattle

Blog posts on ITIL and ITSM news and best practice from the ISG ITIL Team

Category: ITIL

Doing certain things now will give us breathing and thinking space to assess our next response. First aid training includes a pre-prioritised list of immediate actions. Battlefield medics use MARCH, which in priority order means: Massive hemorrhage – if this isn’t stopped rapidly, everything else is in vain Airway – ensure an airway, as without a […]

The sketch shows a general store front. Whilst it functions perfectly adequately for a film set, if you wish to buy vittles [1] you will be disappointed! What we may think of as Service may not be. It may be just a function. So what is the difference between a Function and a Service? Can […]

What is a Service? The ITIL definition, if you’re not familiar with it, is about co-creating value by “facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve, but without the ownership of specific costs and risks”. The first time I read this, it threw me a little. I thought to myself: “The way this is written, it makes […]

Whenever someone asks me for a report, my response is usually “Why?  What do you wish to achieve?” I’m not (just) channeling my inner Mordac, rather I’m trying to make the outcome as beneficial as possible. Firstly , a report always answers a question, but that question may be unstated or ill-defined. Secondly, the underlying […]

Contrary to the stereotype that Change Managers typically want paperwork in triplicate, this particular Change Manager has always been dead set against duplication of effort, and so triplication will be right out. Today I want to write a little about duplication, value, and how to keep the right balance. When I think about duplication, I’m […]

A Look Back This week the blog is a celebration of how far we have come on our ITIL® journey. Sometimes it has been a winding uphill road but perhaps blue sky is ahead… It might seem an odd time to reflect but as the University has just passed through arguably the busiest time of […]

For his last few blog posts (notably in last week’s blog), James has been teasing about the ITIL “Guiding Principles” highlighted in the current iteration (ITIL4). Whilst I feel like a drum roll might now be anticipated given the build-up, these principles are not new and indeed are common sense!  I’ve often felt that a […]

To an outside observer, the Change Manger appears to undergo a shocking change during the start of semester period, like something out of gothic fiction. We go from a normal, everyday perspective on making changes, to locking down the work that we do in order to reduce the immediate risk to the services we run, […]

The majority of people don’t want to plan. They want to be free of the responsibility of planning. B. F. Skinner (Walden Two) I once heard a senior manager declare that they didn’t consider disaster planning useful as their staff did their best work under pressure… So, why should we plan?  I think we may […]

The word “Incident” has been used for many years at The University of Edinburgh. We used it in our original Call Management tool Remedy, then in CMS and when UniDesk our current ITSM tool launched, our individual tickets were called “Incidents”. This never really sat well with the ITIL aware among us and so, in […]

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