ITIL Tattle

ITIL Tattle

Blog posts on ITIL and ITSM news and best practice from the ISG ITIL Team

Category: ITIL

Service desks exist on a spectrum from call logging to expert, and the University has the full range of service desks currently. However, what are the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches?  Where is the best place to position your service desk? Let’s describe the two extremes ends of the spectrum initially. Call Logging This […]

Did you know that if you report a problem with your email account there’s the potential that up to 7 teams could end up working on your problem to ensure its resolved? You probably didn’t and, if we’re delivering quality services nor should you. Did you know that there are 8 directorates made up of […]

Sometimes even the best planned work can go wrong. Often you can identify the best planned work not by its resistance to failure, but by its resilience or recovery in the face of it. Reducing the likelihood of things going wrong is one part of planning for a change. Reducing the consequence if the worst […]

Two weeks ago Robert asked us to consider if our Knowledge Management practice is best practice and to consider how we can  move our current Knowledge Management practice closer to best practice. As a reminder, in ITIL4 Knowledge management aims to ensure that stakeholders get the right information, in the proper format, at the right level, and […]

Every organisation will have something that appears to be straightforward but somehow they make a mess of it! And what is more frustrating is that it is easy to articulate the problem yet the solution is far more complex. Often these seemingly straightforward issues have the characteristic of being an event that may be anticipated […]

One of my firmest beliefs is that when we try new things, particularly when introducing new procedures, we should keep things as simple as possible. The ITIL 4 guiding principles back me up on this; “Keep it simple and practical”. But why? To help answer that question, let’s contrast simplicity and complexity. In general, simplicity […]

Hello ITIL Tattlers! This week finds us bringing you ITIL Tattle in unprecedented times and it’s now more than ever that process and routine can help people adapt to the strange world we find ourselves in. Most of us are trying to adapt to ways of working from home, whether that be working out a […]

“Where are you?” might be a common question, but how does that apply to processes?  The answer is “not at all”! Let’s consider a basic process.  Something will trigger the process, then there will be inputs, some sort of activity or task to perform, then outputs.  Good processes will have feedback loops, governance, etc. However, […]

In 1996, a PhD supervisor was in New Zealand on sabbatical and so guidance seemed impossible. Yet my email request for feedback, sent from Edinburgh, received a reply within under 5 minutes. This post is not a rant about email. Instead it probes the default assumption that service desks need to support email as a […]

      This week I’m getting the ITIL deLorean out and taking us back to 2015, when Gavin McLachlan our CIO first set out his plans for Service Management in Information Services (ISG) at the University of Edinburgh. It was Gavin who first introduced the idea of Service Management roles, focussing on 3 specific […]

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