Buddhism Teaching Resources

Buddhism Teaching Resources

Teach about Buddhism with a little help from Edinburgh Buddhist Studies

Author: Naomi Appleton

In the last session in the Key Concepts in Buddhism for RMPS teachers series we discuss two important Buddhist practices, and explore how they relate to other concepts from earlier sessions. The recording captures the presentation part of the session (not the Q&A) and the Powerpoint file contains additional resources and links in the notes. […]

Here is the recording of the fourth presentation in our series on key concepts for RMPS teachers of Buddhism National 5 and Highers qualifications. Our theme this month was the eightfold path and five precepts, and we particularly focused on issues of ethics or good conduct (sīla). As always, the powerpoint file contains additional resources, […]

Here is a story that I find useful when discussing the five precepts (against killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, and taking intoxicants). This story is number 459 in a large collection of past-life stories of the Buddha (the Jātakatthavaṇṇanā) found in Pali and preserved by the Theravada school of Buddhism. The text was probably composed […]

Our third session in the Key Concepts series for RMPS teachers explored understandings of kamma and rebirth, and of the attainment of nibbāna, the exit from the cycle of rebirth altogether. Here you can find a recording of the presentation part (though not the Q&A) and the powerpoint file. The latter contains links to additional […]

Many teachers use images of the bhavacakra (wheel of rebirth, also referred to sometimes as samsāra-cakra) in class as way to prompt discussion. Here is a story of how these images came to exist. Note that it refers to a fivefold wheel, excluding the realm of the asuras (antigods, demons, demigods) that is sometimes added […]

The second session in our Key Concepts series for school teachers of the Buddhism part of the Highers/National 5 RMPS curriculum addressed the three marks of existence, namely the position that all of our experiences are dukkha (suffering/unsatisfactory), anicca (impermanent), and anattā (not-self). The powerpoint slides contain additional notes and links to resources, and the […]

We very much enjoyed this session, the first in our series of events for teachers of RMPS in Scotland, exploring the three jewels or refuges. We here share the powerpoint slides, which also contain – in the notes area – additional information and links. We also have a recording of the presentation (though not the […]

We are pleased to announce a new series of CPD sessions for school teachers. This series of talks addresses each area of the Buddhism section of the Nat5/Higher RMPS curriculum. Each session will begin with a presentation introducing the relevant concepts and some sources that might be used to explore them in the classroom, and […]

Buddhism through 108 objects in Scotland: Object 3 – Amida Buddha Statue in the National Museum of Scotland This statue in the collection of the National Museum of Scotland is a Japanese depiction of the Amida Buddha. It was bought in 1902 by the Scottish trader James Douglas Fletcher to decorate his large estate, Rosehaugh, […]

Buddhism through 108 objects in Scotland: Object 2 – Buddha statues for sale in Edinburgh supermarket The vast majority of Buddhist images in Scotland are purely decorative, such as these Buddha statues for sale in my local supermarket. A Buddha image is bought, alongside a gnome, as an ornament for one’s garden, home or business. […]

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